Bringing the Benighted into the Light of Progressive Virtue with Progressive Education

Devout progressives believe that the benighted must be brought into the light of progressive virtue; those ignorant of political correctness must be reeducated.

The unconscious logic supporting this belief goes like this, starting from the “Human beings are inherently and transcendentally noble” branch of the newthink worldview tree:

• Human beings are inherently and transcendentally noble.
• Our motives are inherently noble.
• We are progressively virtuous.
• Progressive virtue is supremely important.
• Those who do not agree with us – the progressively unvirtuous – are either ignorant or purposely unvirtuous.
• The ignorant progressively unvirtuous must be reeducated.

The unconscious logic branching out of this belief is:

• It is our mission to educate the young about the principles of progressive virtue.
• It is our mission to educate the ignorant from other cultures about the principles of progressive virtue.
• It is our mission to reeducate ignorant or misinformed adults about the principles of progressive virtue.

 

The newthink takeover of education wasn’t motivated by a need to improve a failing American educational system. Along with the news media and the entertainment industry, it was part of the Progressive Missionaries’ undertaking  to reeducate the benighted in progressively-virtuous principles.

As Mona Charen points out in her book Do-Gooders, American children have for centuries attended religious schools, private schools and local public schools. These children grew up and built the U.S. into the richest economy and most powerful military the world has known. But in 1979, the Democrats felt that wasn’t good enough; the U.S. Government must have a Department of Education. The Department of Education, created under Jimmy Carter’s administration, centralized American education and enabled the domination of progressively-virtuous teaching curricula. Since then, progressives have promoted new math, whole language, bilingual education, and now, common core. These and all the other progressive educational improvements aren’t free. The U.S. spends more than almost any of its peers on K-12 schooling, yet our high-schoolers performance is only middling, and our high school completion rate is plunging. Despite many progressive educational innovations and massive spending, the longer a student is in our educational system, the worse he compares to his international peers.*

American children have for centuries attended religious schools, private schools and local public schools. These children grew up and built the U.S. into the richest economy and most powerful military the world has known. But in 1979, the Democrats felt that wasn’t good enough; the U.S. Government must have a Department of Education.

So, progressive educators have taken over American education, instituted lots of new progressive teaching methods, spent truckloads of money, and as the result our children’s educational level has plummeted and is now circling the drain. If the main purpose of progressive education were to educate children, it would be a disastrous failure. But forget that. Progressive education has actually succeeded in its actual, primary and largely unconscious mission: the indoctrination of children in politically correct opinions based on progressively-virtuous principles. C. Sheldon Thorne, a professor of history at Golden West University, says that after a dozen years of public school, his college students in U.S. History are exquisitely aware of every subtlety of racism, sexism, and imperialism throughout America’s history, but unable to write as much as a paragraph coherently about any of them. According to Thorne, they have it all figured out: the constitution – a racist document from rich white men; westward migration – fueled by greed and distinguished by genocide; slavery – a practice which occurred only in America. To them, America is bad to the bone.**

* Mona Charen, Do-Gooders, (New York: Sentinel, 2004)

** C. Sheldon Thorne, from Mona Charen, Do-Gooders, (New York: Sentinel, 2004), pp. 233-4.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s